Calendar of Events

Programs take place in the museum unless otherwise specified. Click here for public tour registration.
Highlights Tours | Thursdays–Sundays, 12:30 & 2pm
Family Tour: Eyes on Art | Every Second Saturday, 12:15pm

Oct
28
Fri
Member Tour | Beyond Death
Oct 28 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Member Tour | Beyond Death

Halloween comes but once a year – start the scary season off right with a tour of spiritual, surreal, and supernatural artwork. We will take you through our galleries and beyond the beyond in this special tour focused entirely on traditions of death, burial, and the afterlife. Availability is limited. Email invitations will be sent with registration links.

Oct
29
Sat
Member Tour | Beyond Death
Oct 29 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Member Tour | Beyond Death

Halloween comes but once a year – start the scary season off right with a tour of spiritual, surreal, and supernatural artwork. We will take you through our galleries and beyond the beyond in this special tour focused entirely on traditions of death, burial, and the afterlife. Availability is limited. Email invitations will be sent with registration links.

Dec
26
Mon
Highlights Tour
Dec 26 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Highlights Tour

A docent guided tour of collection highlights. Availability is limited to 15 participants and advance registration is recommended. A face mask/covering is encouraged. Same-day admission is included in the price of your tour ticket. 

Jan
26
Thu
Panel Discussion: The Art of Flameworking
Jan 26 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Panel Discussion: The Art of Flameworking

Stigmatized by its associations with cannabis, flameworked glass has been almost completely left out of the broader discussion surrounding the contemporary glass art movement. Recent public policy shifts and greater inclusivity within the glass art community are turning the tide, bringing long-overdue recognition to the contributions of flameworkers. Brandy Culp, curator of Fired Up: Glass Today, moderates a discussion between artists David Colton, Kim Thomas, Carmen Lozar, and Curator of Postwar and Contemporary Glass at the Corning Museum of Glass Susie Silbert about the history, artistry, and everadvancing technology of flameworking to shed light on this historically under-appreciated technique. Listen as some of the major voices in contemporary flameworking reflect on the art form’s journey from scientific laboratories and underground studios to the mainstream art world. Free with required registration. 

Feb
3
Fri
Highlights Tour
Feb 3 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Highlights Tour

A docent guided tour of collection highlights. Availability is limited to 15 participants and advance registration is recommended. A face mask/covering is encouraged. Same-day admission is included in the price of your tour ticket. 

Feb
9
Thu
Highlights Tour
Feb 9 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Highlights Tour

A docent guided tour of collection highlights. Availability is limited to 15 participants and advance registration is recommended. A face mask/covering is encouraged. Same-day admission is included in the price of your tour ticket. 

The Pennington Lecture with Dr. Jelani Cobb | The Half-Life of Freedom: Race and Justice in America Today
Feb 9 @ 5:00 pm
The Pennington Lecture with Dr. Jelani Cobb | The Half-Life of Freedom: Race and Justice in America Today

In-person tickets have SOLD OUT. Register for the live stream to attend the lecture via Zoom.

5pm reception, 6pm lecture—In museum & virtual 
Jelani Cobb, PhD, is an expert on how race, politics, history, and popular culture intersect in America. Author of the highly acclaimed book The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress, Cobb also writes about police brutality, voter access, racial discord, and partisan polarization and eloquently explores how the past looms in our contemporary societal landscape and how we can collectively push toward a more equitable America. Jelani Cobb discusses the complex dynamics of race and racism in America, to clarify them and inspire his audience to collective activism with the goal of achieving equity in the form of genuine democracy. He shows us that not only are the levers of justice in our hands, but we can move them in the direction we see fit. 

The Pennington Lecture is presented in honor of the Rev. Dr. James W. C. Pennington and is part of Capital Community College’s Black Heritage Project. The project aims to surface the remarkable history of the first Black church and school for Black children in Hartford through an exhibition on Hartford’s Black community formation (now on view at the college), curriculum in a variety of courses, and programs such as this.  

This lecture is sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Capital Community College Foundation and presented as a collaboration between Capital Community College, The Amistad Center for Art & Culture, and the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art. 

Apr
12
Wed
Lecture | Small Wonders: Netherlandish Boxwood Carving of the Early 16th Century with Barbara Drake Boehm
Apr 12 @ 6:00 pm
Lecture | Small Wonders: Netherlandish Boxwood Carving of the Early 16th Century with Barbara Drake Boehm

In the early sixteenth century, artists in the Low Countries carved intricate miniatures from boxwood as symbols of religious devotion for their wealthy Christian patrons. Today, these carvings produce an uncanny effect on museum visitors—they stop people in their tracks and demand to be remembered.

Why do these tiny treasures from half a millennium ago have such an outsized impact today? Barbara Drake Boehm, The Paul and Jill Ruddock Senior Curator of the Met Cloisters, Emerita, explores the world of these small wonders and ponders their mesmerizing effect. Free with required reservation. 

Presented in partnership with the Design and Decorative Arts Council with additional support provided by the Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation Fund at the Wadsworth Atheneum.

Image: Attributed to Adam Dircksz and workshop, Miniature coffin, c. 1500–1530. Boxwood, metal (possibly silver), ink or paint. Gift of the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving and The Evelyn Bonar Storrs Trust Fund

Apr
20
Thu
Remembering a Dance: Yvonne Rainer and Emily Coates in Conversation
Apr 20 @ 6:00 pm
Remembering a Dance: Yvonne Rainer and Emily Coates in Conversation

In 1965, choreographer and filmmaker Yvonne Rainer premiered Parts of Some Sextets at the Wadsworth Atheneum with a cast of ten performers and twelve mattresses. The work marked a pivotal aesthetic shift in the artist’s approach to movement and helped usher in a radical shift in contemporary dance. Nearly six decades after its presentation here and a subsequent presentation at Judson Dance Theater, the work’s impact continues to be felt through a recent revival and continued scholarship. To celebrate the publication of Remembering a Dance: Parts of Some Sextets, 1965/2019 (Performa / Lenz Press / Wadsworth Atheneum, 2023), Rainer returns to the Wadsworth in conversation with dancer, choreographer, and longtime collaborator Emily Coates. The artists reflect on Rainer’s pioneering career, discuss the process of reconstructing Parts of Some Sextets for the Performa 19 Biennial in New York, and consider the landscape of contemporary dance.

Free with required reservation. A book signing follows the conversation.

Presented in partnership with Performa and sponsored by the Auerbach Library Associates at the Wadsworth Atheneum. Additional support is provided by the Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation Fund at the Wadsworth Atheneum.

Image: Yvonne Rainer, Parts of Some Sextets, 1965/2019. Performa 19 Biennial. Photo by Paula Court, 2019. Courtesy Performa

May
4
Thu
Highlights Tour
May 4 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Highlights Tour

A docent guided tour of collection highlights. Availability is limited to 15 participants and advance registration is recommended. A face mask/covering is encouraged. Same-day admission is included in the price of your tour ticket.