Calendar of Events

Programs take place in the museum unless otherwise specified. Click here for public tour registration.
Highlights Tours | Thursdays–Sundays, 12:30 & 2pm
Family Tour: Eyes on Art | Every Second Saturday, 12:15pm

Jan
26
Thu
Panel Discussion: The Art of Flameworking
Jan 26 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Panel Discussion: The Art of Flameworking

Stigmatized by its associations with cannabis, flameworked glass has been almost completely left out of the broader discussion surrounding the contemporary glass art movement. Recent public policy shifts and greater inclusivity within the glass art community are turning the tide, bringing long-overdue recognition to the contributions of flameworkers. Brandy Culp, curator of Fired Up: Glass Today, moderates a discussion between artists David Colton, Kim Thomas, Carmen Lozar, and Curator of Postwar and Contemporary Glass at the Corning Museum of Glass Susie Silbert about the history, artistry, and everadvancing technology of flameworking to shed light on this historically under-appreciated technique. Listen as some of the major voices in contemporary flameworking reflect on the art form’s journey from scientific laboratories and underground studios to the mainstream art world. Free with required registration. 

Apr
20
Thu
Remembering a Dance: Yvonne Rainer and Emily Coates in Conversation
Apr 20 @ 6:00 pm
Remembering a Dance: Yvonne Rainer and Emily Coates in Conversation

In 1965, choreographer and filmmaker Yvonne Rainer premiered Parts of Some Sextets at the Wadsworth Atheneum with a cast of ten performers and twelve mattresses. The work marked a pivotal aesthetic shift in the artist’s approach to movement and helped usher in a radical shift in contemporary dance. Nearly six decades after its presentation here and a subsequent presentation at Judson Dance Theater, the work’s impact continues to be felt through a recent revival and continued scholarship. To celebrate the publication of Remembering a Dance: Parts of Some Sextets, 1965/2019 (Performa / Lenz Press / Wadsworth Atheneum, 2023), Rainer returns to the Wadsworth in conversation with dancer, choreographer, and longtime collaborator Emily Coates. The artists reflect on Rainer’s pioneering career, discuss the process of reconstructing Parts of Some Sextets for the Performa 19 Biennial in New York, and consider the landscape of contemporary dance.

Free with required reservation. A book signing follows the conversation.

Presented in partnership with Performa and sponsored by the Auerbach Library Associates at the Wadsworth Atheneum. Additional support is provided by the Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation Fund at the Wadsworth Atheneum.

Image: Yvonne Rainer, Parts of Some Sextets, 1965/2019. Performa 19 Biennial. Photo by Paula Court, 2019. Courtesy Performa

May
6
Sat
Film: Children of the Mist (2021)
May 6 @ 2:00 pm
Film: Children of the Mist (2021)

In a village hidden in the mist-shrouded northwest Vietnamese mountains, an indigenous Hmong community is home to twelve-year-old Di, part of the first generation of her people with access to formal education. A free spirit, she happily recounts her experiences to Vietnamese filmmaker Diem Ha Le, who embedded herself in Di’s family over three years to document this unique coming of age. As Di grows, her carefree childhood gives way to an impulsive and sensitive adolescence, a dangerous temperament for what will happen next; in this insular community, girls endure the controversial but accepted tradition of “bride kidnapping.” One night, Di’s parents return from celebrating the Lunar New Year to find that their daughter has disappeared. Winner of the Best Directing award at the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam, Diem’s film is a tender portrait of a community caught between tradition and modernity with one girl tragically stuck in the middle. Directed by Diem Ha Le. 92 minutes. Not rated.

$9; $7 seniors and students with ID; $6 members and Wadsworth Welcome. Museum admission not included.

May
7
Sun
Film: Children of the Mist (2021)
May 7 @ 4:00 pm
Film: Children of the Mist (2021)

In a village hidden in the mist-shrouded northwest Vietnamese mountains, an indigenous Hmong community is home to twelve-year-old Di, part of the first generation of her people with access to formal education. A free spirit, she happily recounts her experiences to Vietnamese filmmaker Diem Ha Le, who embedded herself in Di’s family over three years to document this unique coming of age. As Di grows, her carefree childhood gives way to an impulsive and sensitive adolescence, a dangerous temperament for what will happen next; in this insular community, girls endure the controversial but accepted tradition of “bride kidnapping.” One night, Di’s parents return from celebrating the Lunar New Year to find that their daughter has disappeared. Winner of the Best Directing award at the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam, Diem’s film is a tender portrait of a community caught between tradition and modernity with one girl tragically stuck in the middle. Directed by Diem Ha Le. 92 minutes. Not rated.

$9; $7 seniors and students with ID; $6 members and Wadsworth Welcome. Museum admission not included.

Jun
23
Fri
Film: Close
Jun 23 @ 7:00 pm
Film: Close

Léo (Eden Dambrine) and Remi (Gustav De Waele) are two thirteen-year-old best friends whose seemingly unbreakable bond is suddenly, tragically torn apart. Winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, Lukas Dhont’s second film is an emotionally transformative and unforgettable portrait of the intersection of friendship and love, identity and independence, and heartbreak and healing. Co-presented by Out Film CT. Image courtesy of A24.

Directed by Lukas Dhont (Girl, 2018). 105 minutes. Rated PG-13. $9; $7 seniors and students with ID; $6 members and Wadsworth Welcome. Museum admission not included.

Jun
24
Sat
Film: Close
Jun 24 @ 2:00 pm
Film: Close

Léo (Eden Dambrine) and Remi (Gustav De Waele) are two thirteen-year-old best friends whose seemingly unbreakable bond is suddenly, tragically torn apart. Winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, Lukas Dhont’s second film is an emotionally transformative and unforgettable portrait of the intersection of friendship and love, identity and independence, and heartbreak and healing. Co-presented by Out Film CT. Images courtesy of A24.

Directed by Lukas Dhont (Girl, 2018). 105 minutes. Rated PG-13. $9; $7 seniors and students with ID; $6 members and Wadsworth Welcome. Museum admission not included.

Jun
25
Sun
Film: Close
Jun 25 @ 2:00 pm
Film: Close

Léo (Eden Dambrine) and Remi (Gustav De Waele) are two thirteen-year-old best friends whose seemingly unbreakable bond is suddenly, tragically torn apart. Winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, Lukas Dhont’s second film is an emotionally transformative and unforgettable portrait of the intersection of friendship and love, identity and independence, and heartbreak and healing. Co-presented by Out Film CT. Images courtesy of A24.

Directed by Lukas Dhont (Girl, 2018). 105 minutes. Rated PG-13. $9; $7 seniors and students with ID; $6 members and Wadsworth Welcome. Museum admission not included.

Jul
14
Fri
Film Under the Stars: Summer of Soul (2021)
Jul 14 @ 8:30 pm
Film Under the Stars: Summer of Soul (2021)

Directed by Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson. US. 1 hour 58 minutes. Rated PG-13. 

“Summer of Soul” (…Or, “When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised”) is a breathtaking documentary that captures the magic and cultural significance of the Harlem Cultural Festival in 1969. The Academy Award–winning film (Best Documentary Feature 2021) showcases electrifying performances by some of the biggest names in music history including Stevie Wonder, Nina Simone, and Sly and the Family Stone. Come celebrate the power of music to unite people and create positive change by seeing the film outdoors under the stars. Don’t miss your chance to be transported back to the summer of ’69. A must-see documentary for anyone who loves music and history or wants to be inspired by the power of human connection.

$10; $8 seniors and students with ID; $7 members and Wadsworth Welcome. Museum admission not included.

Image: © 2021 20th Century Studios. All rights reserved.

Jul
20
Thu
Film | Frederick Douglass: In Five Speeches (2022)
Jul 20 @ 2:00 pm
Film | Frederick Douglass: In Five Speeches (2022)

Directed by Julia Marchesi. US. 58 minutes. Rated TV-MA.

Frederick Douglas: In Five Speeches explores the life and legacy of the prominent African American abolitionist, orator, and statesman. The film features five of Frederick Douglass’s notable speeches, each one revealing a different aspect of his activism and intellectual prowess. Archival footage, interviews with scholars, and dramatic readings of Douglass’s speeches by actors present a vivid portrait of one of America’s most inspiring and influential figures and sheds light on his enduring relevance to the fight for racial justice today.

Producer Henry Louis Gates Jr., a renowned historian and scholar of African American history, hosts the documentary and provides historical context and commentary on each of the speeches, highlighting their significance, impact on the abolitionist movement, and the struggle for civil rights. Free with museum admission.

Jul
21
Fri
Film | Frederick Douglass: In Five Speeches (2022)
Jul 21 @ 2:00 pm
Film | Frederick Douglass: In Five Speeches (2022)

Directed by Julia Marchesi. US. 58 minutes. Rated TV-MA.

Frederick Douglas: In Five Speeches explores the life and legacy of the prominent African American abolitionist, orator, and statesman. The film features five of Frederick Douglass’s notable speeches, each one revealing a different aspect of his activism and intellectual prowess. Archival footage, interviews with scholars, and dramatic readings of Douglass’s speeches by actors present a vivid portrait of one of America’s most inspiring and influential figures and sheds light on his enduring relevance to the fight for racial justice today.

Producer Henry Louis Gates Jr., a renowned historian and scholar of African American history, hosts the documentary and provides historical context and commentary on each of the speeches, highlighting their significance, impact on the abolitionist movement, and the struggle for civil rights. Free with museum admission.